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FAQ

HERE ARE SOME COMMON QUESTIONS  

If you don't find what you're looking for, please email or call me at 310.946.6361 and I can answer any questions you have.


1.What happens during free consultation?

Our complimentary consultation is a chance for you to get familiar with the therapy process, ask any questions you may have, and to discuss your goals for therapy.


2.how frequent are sessions?

Sessions are typically once a week. Some people find extended or more frequent sessions to be helpful.


3.How do I know you are the right therapist for me?

This is an important question, as most studies show that the fit between the client and the therapist is a very important predictor for a successful therapy. You are encouraged to take your time in choosing your therapist, and get the information you need to make your decision. I encourage you to take advantage of a free face-to-face consultation I offer to see if we are a good fit. Some of the questions to ask yourself as you meet with a therapist are:

  • How easy is the person to talk to?

  • Do they seem like somebody I could trust?

  • Do they seem confident and competent?

  • Do I feel comfortable?

  • Could I ever show this person the deepest, parts of myself?

  • Mostly, "Do I like them?"


I am in-network with Medicare and out-of-network for all other plans. For out-of-network plans, I will collect payment from you at the visit.  As a courtesy, I can bill your insurance for you or give you a "superbill" to submit for your own reimbursement. If you have out-of-network benefits, it's likely your insurance will reimburse you for a portion of the cost.

4.Do you take insurance?


I tend to work between the hours of 10am - 8pm Tuesday - Thursday and 10am - 7pm Saturday and Sunday.

5.What are your hours?


Occasionally, when needed, I can offer these services to clients with whom I have a strong therapeutic relationship already established.  If you're a frequent traveler or simply unable to visit my office, we can hold sessions over a secure HIPPA-compliant tele-health platform.  Keep in mind that online therapy is only available to individuals who are residents of California and may not be covered by your insurance plan.

6.Do you do therapy via online?


People can realize that they're transgender at any age. Some people can trace their awareness back to their earlier memories – they just knew. Others may need more time to realize that they are transgender. Some people may spend years feeling like they don't fit in without really understanding why, or may try to avoid thinking or talking about their gender out of fear, shame, or confusion. Trying to repress or change one’s gender identity doesn’t work; in fact, it can be very painful and damaging to one’s emotional and mental health. As transgender people become more visible in the media and in community life across the country, more transgender people are able to name and understand their own experiences and may feel safer and more comfortable sharing it with others.

7. How does someone know that they are transgender?


Trying to repress or change one’s gender identity doesn’t work; in fact, it can be very painful and damaging to one’s emotional and mental health. As transgender people become more visible in the media and in community life across the country, more transgender people are able to name and understand their own experiences and may feel safer and more comfortable sharing it with others.

8. Will avoiding thinking about transgender identity make it go away?


Gender identity and sexual orientation are two different things. Gender identity refers to your internal knowledge of your own gender—for example, your knowledge that you're a man, a woman, or another gender. Sexual orientation has to do with whom you’re attracted to.

9. What's the difference between sexual orientation and gender identity?


Being gender non-conforming means not conforming to gender stereotypes. For example, someone’s clothes, hairstyle, speech patterns, or hobbies might be considered more "feminine" or "masculine" than what's stereotypically associated with their gender.

Gender non-conforming people may or may not be transgender. For example, some women who were raised and identify as women present themselves in ways that might be considered masculine, like by having short hair or wearing stereotypically masculine clothes. The term “tomboy” refers to girls who are gender non-conforming, which often means they play rough sports, hang out with boys, and dress in more masculine clothing.

Similarly, transgender people may be gender non-conforming, or they might conform to gender stereotypes for the gender they live and identify as.

10. What is the difference between being transgender and being gender non-conforming?


Transitioning is the time period during which a person begins to live according to their gender identity, rather than the gender they were thought to be at birth. While not all transgender people transition, a great many do at some point in their lives. Gender transition looks different for every person. Possible steps in a gender transition may or may not include changing your clothing, appearance, name, or the pronoun people use to refer to you (like “she,” “he,” or “they”). Some people are able to change their identification documents, like their driver’s license or passport, to reflect their gender. And some people undergo hormone therapy or other medical procedures to change their physical characteristics and make their body better reflect the gender they know themselves to be.

Transitioning can help many transgender people lead healthy, fulfilling lives. No specific set of steps is necessary to “complete” a transition—it’s a matter of what is right for each person. All transgender people are entitled to the same dignity and respect, regardless of which legal or medical steps they have taken.

11. What does "gender transition" mean?


It depends.  California is generally considered "informed consent" state when it comes to hormone therapy.  Meaning, most of providers prescribing hormones, and certainly all of the transgender specific clinics I know, will not require a letter from a therapist.  If you are uncertain about which clinic to choose, refer to transgender resources list outlining medical providers specializing in transgender care.

12. Do I need to see a therapist to get a letter approval for hormones?


A list of medical providers specializing in transgender health is listed under transgender resources.  If you can't find what you are looking for, please email me directly and I'd be happy to help. 

13. How do I find the right medical provider specializing in transgender health?


*Some of the transgender related questions and answers are courtesy of National Center for Transgender Equality.